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Coca Cola Douche

Written by: 6 March 2018 No Comment

So Jeff’s got a new single – his first for a number of years and as a fan I both liked and listened… and learnt stuff I shall soon forget

Makes a change from Peking Duk I suppose


The Fugs are a band formed in New York City in late 1964[1] by the poets Ed Sanders and Tuli Kupferberg, with Ken Weaver on drums. Soon afterward, they were joined by Peter Stampfel and Steve Weber of the Holy Modal Rounders. Kupferberg named the band from a euphemism for fuck used in Norman Mailer‘s novel The Naked and the Dead.

The band is known for its comedic, even lewd, nature but also earned fame through their persistent anti-Vietnam War sentiment during the 1960s.[2] Some 1969 correspondence found inside an FBI file on the rock group The Doors called the New York band the “most vulgar thing the human mind could possibly conceive.”[3]

Aside from derision for their “scatological”[4] lyrics, the Fugs have also been labeled “avant-rock.” (wiki)

Underground legend Tuli Kupferberg (1923-2010) was always the oldest man in rock and roll, co-founding the Fugs in the winter of 1964-1965 when he was already in his early 40s.  Being twice the age of Dylan, Reed, Jagger, et. al, never stopped Tuli from consistently being more outrageous.  Latter-day bohemian torch-bearer Jeffrey Lewis befriended Tuli in the early 2000s, and has personally organized “Tuli-day” memorial tribute concerts every year since Tuli’s passing.  This album documents some of the finer fruits of Jeffrey’s tribute arrangements, drawing from a four-decade range of Tuli’s various creative voices, from poignant 60s classics (“Morning Morning”) to never-recorded lyrics (“Listen to the Mockingbird”), poems set to music (“The And Song”), works that Tuli called parasongs(“I Wanna Hold Your Foot”) and later-period Fugs gems (“Try to Be Joyful”).  Across the board Jeffrey Lewis directs a co-ed band of wild and wooly cohorts, including original Fugs member Peter Stampfel, to bring the same surprising interpretive life to these covers as he brought to his critically-acclaimed 12 Crass Songs album.  Whether or not you’re a Fugs fan or a Jeffrey Lewis fan, Works by Tuli Kupferberg is a rollicking, laughing, tear-jerking, psychedelic ride through a hidden history of New York City folk-punk sub-genius.  Recorded in the free-wheeling spirit of the original 1965 Fugs recordings, this is an album fifty years in the making.


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